Posts Tagged ‘hospital’

Supporting Patient Engagement

January 23rd, 2012

As the patient engagement “movement” grows, there are many health care practitioners and health systems who want to interact differently with patients – whether to improve patient satisfaction scores, obtain pay for performance incentives, meet standards for Patient-Centered Medical Homes or Accountable Care Organizations, or from a heartfelt desire to collaborate to improve outcomes as defined by patients.

The question most ask is “how?”.  “What does patient engagement look like in practice?  What does it look like in my practice?  What specifically do I do?”

Here are some examples (Hospital edition):

At the Institution Level —

  • Hire and empower a Patient Ombudsman to elicit and respond to patient and family questions and concerns
  • Get the administrators out of the office sometimes and take them on Executive Team Rounding to actually meet patients
  • Conduct Patient/Family Surveys and Patient/Family Focus Groups and analyze, display, and use the data
  • Convene Patient/Family Advisory Boards
  • Appoint Patients and Patient family Members on  your Governing Board

At the Health Care Practitioner Level

  • Understand and assess your patients to ascertain their differences in preferences and capacity for engagement (Read Dr. Jerome Groopman’s  and Dr. Pamela Hartzband’s Your Medical Mind)
  • Give your patients and their families permission to partner with you. Voice your willingness to be answer questions, explain things more fully.
  • Ask permission to connect with patients. (It demonstrates respect)
  • Don’t swoop. As workflow permits, time your visits to patients when they are awake and family is present. (At 5:30 am after a restless night in the hospital most patients are not at their most cogent and inquisitive.)
  • Share information.Share with your colleagues to enhance coordination and share with patients to help them ask the right questions and make the right decisions (for them).
  • Start preparing patients for post-discharge self-management as early as possible

Thank you for your support

Patients’ Rights come to the Hospital

January 18th, 2011

There is sometimes a mismatch these days between the expectations that empowered patients have and the experiences they encounter in the hospital or other care settings. Great hospitals will recognize that respecting patients’ rights is not necessarily at odds with quality care but an integral part. Although we live in an overly litigious society, if we view patients’ rights as really the culmination of the Golden Rule, Quality Care and Common Sense, I believe that we can find a middle ground that respects the rights of both patients and providers. Every nurse, physician and hospital executive should ask themselves would they be satisfied being a patient in their own facility.

A Patient’s Quest for Quality in Healthcare

October 5th, 2009

As part of an otherwise excellent presentation on the key drivers of rising healthcare costs, two slides purported to demonstrate that overbuilding of healthcare facilities was the result of inappropriate emphasis by patients on facilities’ cleanliness and convenience as measurements of quality.  The presenter’s point was that patients could not be trusted to assess healthcare quality since they chose such obviously silly metrics instead of judging and selecting hospitals or physician practices on the basis of cost, outcomes, or adherence to guidelines.

I had several thoughts in reaction, a few of which I can print – (1) With upwards of 2 million nosocomial (my favorite word) infections a year causing more that 100,000 deaths and complications, cleanliness is nothing to sneeze at; (2) in a past life I was taken to task by the HRSA administrator for making the point that there might be value in having the choice of  a transplant center close enough that families could support their loved one through a traumatic life event so I won’t comment here on the issue of proximity; but most importantly (3) patients judge what they can see.  If we make quality metrics such as cost, outcomes, and adherence to guidelines more accessible to patients then they will include those metrics in their decisionmaking.

And so I embarked on my own journey to see how readily available patient-friendly quality data is for patients.  First I looked for information on hospital information.  Hospital Compare http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov/, an HHS website powered by Medicare data, allowed me to compare hospitals within a radius of my chosen zipcode on process of care (basically guidelines/evidence) adherence, outcomes like death, and patient satisfaction elements like physician communication or nurse responsiveness.  Interestingly, among the subset of local hospitals I chose, quality was similar but median Medicare payment ranged from a two to four fold difference.  Still a limited set of procedures and conditions are included, I have no idea how patients with my demographics and characteristics fared, and the Medicare cost data may bear little relation to what I might actually pay under my insurance let alone self-pay.

Physician information is available in a variety of formats for various fees, typically $9.95 to $24.95 on websites such as HealthGrades http://www.healthgrades.com and Physician Reports http://www.physicianreports.com or compiled in the Consumer’s Checkbook Guide to Top Doctors or Castle Connolly’s various city-specific  Top Doctors.  Plugging in one of my specialist’s name I was able to get disciplinary actions (luckily none), board certifications, years of education, hospital affiliations and even ease of scheduling, however I had no idea from the information provided if my doctor was any good.

Lastly my health insurer has a premium designation that awards stars for quality and cost-efficiency.  I could not find the basis for those designations and having been ill-served by one of their “centers of excellence” in a particular specialty, you can color me skeptical.

My takeaway is that even for a highly motivated, insured, internet savvy patient, with fair familiarity with health care and health care jargon, comprehensive actionable physician and facility information is limited, hard to find or non-existent.