Posts Tagged ‘medicine’

A Patient’s Perspective on Medication Compliance (Part 1)

September 7th, 2009

As the costs to the pharmaceutical industry and to the economy from patients not taking their medications as prescribed escalate into the billions and physician reimbursement is increasingly shifted to a “pay for performance” model where they are judged by outcomes as well as interventions, interest in understanding why patients do and do not comply with medication or other therapy recommendations increases.

Surveys of physicians consistently report a top complaint that patients refuse to take their medications as directed. Surveys of patients just as consistently state patients’ views that they are fully compliant with their medication therapeutic regimen. Somewhere in between lies the truth.

First, there’s the term compliance. Compliance, as defined by the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, is the act of conforming, acquiescing, or yielding. A person does not trade her free will for blind obedience when she trades her clothes for a paper gown. In this age of personalized medicine patients demand and deserve a personalized plan on taking that medication to which they are empowered and inspired to adhere.

Second, when a physician asks if a patient has taken her medicine that seems like a yes or no question. In fact, the patient is being asked, “Did you fill the prescription in a timely manner? Did you take the right dose at the right time in the right way every time (with food without food with a full glass of water on an empty stomach without lying back down for 30 minutes)? Did you take all the medicine (even after you felt better)? And did you refill the prescription as soon as you finished the first?” A patient may answer yes if they have fulfilled even one of these criteria.

What would drive a patient, even if diagnosed with diabetes, heart disease, or another serious, life-compromising condition, to not follow “doctor’s orders”?

  • Didn’t like being ordered around by the doctor
  • Medication tastes bad Side effects too much to bear
  • Method of administration painful or unpleasant
  • Taking the medication reminds the patient of her mortality
  • Doesn’t believe the condition is that serious
  • Treatment interferes with lifestyle
  • Forgot

(To be continued in Part II)